Pantheon Rome

Rome - Pantheon - detail
Rome - Pantheon - columnsRome - Pantheon - lightRome - Pantheon - interior viewRome - Pantheon -  view from the piazzaRome - Pantheon - cupolaRome - Pantheon - dome

The Pantheon is located on Campus Martius in the historical center of Rome, just between the Trevi Fountain and Nero’s thermal baths. The first Pantheon was built by Agrippa between 27 and 25 B.C. as a sanctuary dedicated to the 12 gods from the Hellenistic period. The temple was destroyed by fire in 80 A.D. and was rebuilt by Domitian but another fire destroyed it in 110 A.D. Emperor Hadrian had the temple rebuilt for a third time between 118 and 125 A.D. He put the new façade on the north and wrote “Agrippa” on the pediment of the building in honor of the original builder. The north of Campus Martius was dedicated to imperial funerals. When the Emperor Hadrian rebuilt the temple, may have been thinking about representing the sky, hence why there are seven exedra around the rotund made for the statues of the seven planetary gods.

Things to see

The Pantheon is composed of three different geometric forms. First, it has a rectangular building along with a porch with a triangular pediment supported by 16 columns. Then it is composed of a cylinder covered by a huge dome of 43 meters in diameter and in which can be seen an oculus that lets daylight into the building.
The Pantheon was a temple first dedicated to Jupiter then to Mars Ultor, then to Venus, after that to Julius Caesar and finally to all gods before Pope Boniface IV decided to dedicate it to Saint Mary of the Martyrs. The temple was given by the Byzantine Emperor Phocas to Pope Boniface IV in 609, who converted it into a Catholic church. This conversion saved the Pantheon from destruction. The Byzantine Emperor Constans II removed the bronze statues in 663 A.D.; the ones which represented the gods and giants’ fight were destroyed altogether. Pope Gregory IV later dedicated the temple to all Saints.
Nowadays this sanctuary is the resting place of two Italian kings: Victor Emmanuel II and Umberto I.

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Pantheon Rome

Rome - Pantheon - detail
Rome - Pantheon - columnsRome - Pantheon - lightRome - Pantheon - interior viewRome - Pantheon -  view from the piazzaRome - Pantheon - cupolaRome - Pantheon - dome

The Pantheon is located on Campus Martius in the historical center of Rome, just between the Trevi Fountain and Nero’s thermal baths. The first Pantheon was built by Agrippa between 27 and 25 B.C. as a sanctuary dedicated to the 12 gods from the Hellenistic period. The temple was destroyed by fire in 80 A.D. and was rebuilt by Domitian but another fire destroyed it in 110 A.D. Emperor Hadrian had the temple rebuilt for a third time between 118 and 125 A.D. He put the new façade on the north and wrote “Agrippa” on the pediment of the building in honor of the original builder. The north of Campus Martius was dedicated to imperial funerals. When the Emperor Hadrian rebuilt the temple, may have been thinking about representing the sky, hence why there are seven exedra around the rotund made for the statues of the seven planetary gods.

Things to see

The Pantheon is composed of three different geometric forms. First, it has a rectangular building along with a porch with a triangular pediment supported by 16 columns. Then it is composed of a cylinder covered by a huge dome of 43 meters in diameter and in which can be seen an oculus that lets daylight into the building.
The Pantheon was a temple first dedicated to Jupiter then to Mars Ultor, then to Venus, after that to Julius Caesar and finally to all gods before Pope Boniface IV decided to dedicate it to Saint Mary of the Martyrs. The temple was given by the Byzantine Emperor Phocas to Pope Boniface IV in 609, who converted it into a Catholic church. This conversion saved the Pantheon from destruction. The Byzantine Emperor Constans II removed the bronze statues in 663 A.D.; the ones which represented the gods and giants’ fight were destroyed altogether. Pope Gregory IV later dedicated the temple to all Saints.
Nowadays this sanctuary is the resting place of two Italian kings: Victor Emmanuel II and Umberto I.

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Be the first to review “Pantheon Rome”