Campo de Fiori

Rome - Campo de Fiori

The Campo de Fiori (“Fields of Flowers”) is a very animated square of Rome; it was once a meadow and it supposedly has retained its name in remembrance. Another legend says that the name came from the mistress of Pompey the Great, who was known as Madam Flowers.
Everyday in the morning, a small picturesque market sets up in the square where it is possible to find flowers or various fruits and vegetables. During the evening, the square comes to life thanks to its numerous coffee shops and restaurants. It is a nice and well known place where Romans often meet to go out and enjoy the “Dolce Vita”.

Things to see

In the middle of the Campo de Fiori we can admire the impressive statue of the Dominican monk Giordano Bruno. Bruno was a mathematician, poet and philosopher who met Galileo and travelled through Europe. In 1593, he was arrested and convicted of heresy, his trial lasting for 7 years. Because he was such a talented orator, they nailed his tongue to his palate so he could not speak to anyone during his transfer to his place of death: the Campo de Fiori. He was burnt alive on Campo de Fiori on February 16th 1600.
To honor this freethinker, a statue in his likeness was realized by the sculptor Ettore Ferrari and put on the square. It was inaugurated on June 9th 1889 and many other freethinkers came to honor him. Pope Leo XIII said the installation of such a statue was an act of defiance against the Catholic Church. Despite this, each 16th of February, people come and bring flowers to the statue to commemorate the death of Giordano Bruno.
The Campo de Fiori is located nearby the Farnese Palace, a palace from the Renaissance which is now occupied by the embassy of France. The French government bought the palace for a lease of 99 years; the contract is set to expire in 2035.

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Campo de Fiori

Rome - Campo de Fiori

The Campo de Fiori (“Fields of Flowers”) is a very animated square of Rome; it was once a meadow and it supposedly has retained its name in remembrance. Another legend says that the name came from the mistress of Pompey the Great, who was known as Madam Flowers.
Everyday in the morning, a small picturesque market sets up in the square where it is possible to find flowers or various fruits and vegetables. During the evening, the square comes to life thanks to its numerous coffee shops and restaurants. It is a nice and well known place where Romans often meet to go out and enjoy the “Dolce Vita”.

Things to see

In the middle of the Campo de Fiori we can admire the impressive statue of the Dominican monk Giordano Bruno. Bruno was a mathematician, poet and philosopher who met Galileo and travelled through Europe. In 1593, he was arrested and convicted of heresy, his trial lasting for 7 years. Because he was such a talented orator, they nailed his tongue to his palate so he could not speak to anyone during his transfer to his place of death: the Campo de Fiori. He was burnt alive on Campo de Fiori on February 16th 1600.
To honor this freethinker, a statue in his likeness was realized by the sculptor Ettore Ferrari and put on the square. It was inaugurated on June 9th 1889 and many other freethinkers came to honor him. Pope Leo XIII said the installation of such a statue was an act of defiance against the Catholic Church. Despite this, each 16th of February, people come and bring flowers to the statue to commemorate the death of Giordano Bruno.
The Campo de Fiori is located nearby the Farnese Palace, a palace from the Renaissance which is now occupied by the embassy of France. The French government bought the palace for a lease of 99 years; the contract is set to expire in 2035.

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